Tackling roadkill numbers with virtual fencing technology

The devices have been installed along Gruber Avenue
May 15, 2019

Those travelling to Hobart Airport between dusk and dawn may notice a significant decrease in wildlife along Grueber Avenue thanks to the installation of 1km of virtual fencing technology.

The devices have been installed in an effort to improve road safety and reduce the amount of roadkill deaths in the area.

One of the things that makes Tasmania unique and attractive to visitors is the natural environment, including our native animals.

Tasmania has recently earned the unfortunate title of the road kill capital of the world, with more animals dying per kilometre on Tasmanian roads than anywhere else in the world.

For locals and visitors alike, the experience of colliding with our wildlife can be quite traumatic.

We are continually looking for ways to manage and reduce the impact of traffic on our wildlife and expect to see a significant reduction in roadkill deaths with the installation of virtual fencing.

The innovative technology by Wildlife Safety Solutions is activated by oncoming headlights and uses audio alerts along with flashing LED lighting to deter animals from entering the roadway.

Environment Manager Kirsten Leggett with one of the devices along Gruber Avenue

Camera traps are also used to monitor the movements and better understand the behaviour of animals in the airport environment.  

Since the installation of camera traps in early 2016, images collected have shown that many threatened species use the environment around and within the airport boundary including the Tasmanian Devil, the Spotted quoll and the Tasmanian bettong.

We recognise our role in protecting the biodiversity of the airport and Tasmania more broadly and are confident this technology will assist us in doing so.

Initial testing of virtual fencing devices in Tasmania has seen a 50 per cent reduction in road kill deaths over a three-year period and has been instrumental in protecting the remaining Tasmanian Devil population.

The virtual fencing will be monitored by Hobart Airport’s environment team to capture and report data on the rates of roadkill deaths in the area and better understand the behaviour of the animals that call the airport home.

Camera traps are also used to monitor the movements and better understand the behaviour of animals in the airport environment.  

Since the installation of camera traps in early 2016, images collected have shown that many threatened species use the environment around and within the airport boundary including the Tasmanian Devil, the Spotted quoll and the Tasmanian bettong.

We recognise our role in protecting the biodiversity of the airport and Tasmania more broadly and are confident this technology will assist us in doing so.

Environment Manager Kirsten Leggett

Initial testing of virtual fencing devices in Tasmania has seen a 50 per cent reduction in road kill deaths over a three-year period and has been instrumental in protecting the remaining Tasmanian Devil population.

The virtual fencing will be monitored by Hobart Airport’s environment team to capture and report data on the rates of roadkill deaths in the area and better understand the behaviour of the animals that call the airport home.

“We’re building better facilities and a better airport to serve our community”
Sarah Renner
Hobart Airport CEO